New York Times Endorses Clinton's Economic Plan For America, But With a Caveat

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Ben Cohen
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The New York Times Editorial board endorsed Hillary Clinton's economic plan for America, calling it a "good one" that is "largely paid for" and "in keeping with political reality". This in contrast with their withering assessment of Donald Trump's so-called plan for America. 

The endorsement was not without criticism though, particularly on her plans for corporate tax reform. They concluded:

Mrs. Clinton’s economic plan is not comprehensive. On corporate tax reform, for example, she has proposed piecemeal tax penalties to prevent corporations from moving abroad, as well as other measures to prevent corporate tax avoidance, but details on comprehensive change will probably depend on the composition of the next Congress.

The plan Mrs. Clinton does have, however, is a good one. It is largely paid for. It is incremental, not sweeping, which is in keeping with political reality. And in contrast to the Trump plan, which has few details, it is specific enough that the “everyday Americans” she has pledged to help can actually hold her accountable for what she has promised.

To be fair to Clinton, it is completely understandable that she isn't going after corporate America full throttle given she is running in a general election. While many on the left will be disheartened by this, it is worth remembering a couple of things. Firstly, it doesn't really give any indication as to what she will actually do while in office. And second, Clinton is quietly building a giant coalition against Trump from all sectors of American society, and the bigger it is, the better her chances are in November. This coalition has to include America's corporate elite, who are also terrified at the prospect of a Trump presidency. 

Clinton is clearly betting that toning down the anti-corporate theme of the primary battle with Bernie Sanders will pay dividends with potential Republican voters willing to jump ship. While it isn't exactly inspiring for those hoping for serious reform of America's terribly unequal economic policies, it might just win her the election. 

And as every rational person in America understands, there is nothing more important than that.