The Dumbest Drugs Law in History is About to Pass in Britain, But With a Hopeful Catch

Apparently, British politicians are determined to return their country to the dark ages with one of the most regressive pieces of legislation in the nation's history. But there's a catch, and it's a hopeful one.
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Ben Cohen
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Apparently, British politicians are determined to return their country to the dark ages with one of the most regressive pieces of legislation in the nation's history. But there's a catch, and it's a hopeful one.
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Apparently, British politicians are determined to return their country to the dark ages with one of the most regressive pieces of legislation in the nation's history.

The Psychoactive Substances Bill passed its third reading in the Commons yesterday, and looks to go into effect in April of this year. The bill seeks to ban all substances that have a "psychoactive effect" -- a proposition the New Scientistcalled "one of the stupidest, most dangerous and unscientific pieces of drugs legislation ever conceived," and the Guardianlabelled "a work of monumental ignorance that has taken drug legislation beyond the point of farce into the realm of surreal fantasy."

Of course this ban doesn't extend to the most harmful and addictive psychoactive substances on the planet, alcohol, caffeine, nicotine and tobacco, but then that would require a modicum of common sense -- an attribute the British political classes have never  possessed, especially in regards to drugs.

Given the ever growing body of scientific evidence proving substances like psilocybin, marijuana, LSD, MDMA and DMT are only non-toxic, but potentially dramatic cures for mental and physical illnesses -- including depression, anxiety, Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome, fibromyalgia, chronic pain disorders and cancer -- it is mind blowing that the government would choose this time in history to shove through a radically regressive and downright harmful piece of legislation that is totally and utterly unnecessary.

A similar piece of legislation passed in Ireland recently, with disastrous outcomes. Reported Deej Sullivan of Politics.co.uk:

That law, as was pointed out repeatedly to MPs, has been a failure....The drugs are still there, and people are still using them just as much if not more than before, but the safety net that offered some hope of harm reduction has been torched in the name of prohibition.

But, and this is a very tentative but, British politicians also appear to be keen on decriminalizing users -- a catch that could actually pave the way for a far brighter future for those who wish to alter their state of consciousness without the fear of going to prison. Writes Sullivan:

The British politicians who came up with the Psychoactive Substances Bill have been very keen to stress how greatly they admire Ireland’s stance on this issue. With Ireland on the brink of decriminalisation, and with many of our own senior MPs now on record, multiple times, as being against the needless criminalisation of drug users, could it be that we'll eventually follow suit?

For the sake of human progress, one would hope this happens and Brits can get on with their lives without worrying about the police breaking down their doors and taking away their pot -- a truly irrational facet of British society as the science conclusively proves.