Now That These Leaders Are Done Pretending to March, They Should Pass Legislation Protecting Satire

Even if we concede that Obama should have attended (in spite of no precedent along those lines), let's bear in mind that the U.S., for all its faults, leads the world in protected speech -- especially and most importantly satirical speech.
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Even if we concede that Obama should have attended (in spite of no precedent along those lines), let's bear in mind that the U.S., for all its faults, leads the world in protected speech -- especially and most importantly satirical speech.
world-leaders-paris-march

It's entertaining to observe the lengths to which American conservatives will overreach in order to make a nothing issue into a major scandal. Such is the case following the unity march in Paris, attended by 3.7 million people and world leaders from 40 nations. As we covered earlier today, conservatives all around are busily scolding and shaming the president for not walking hand-in-hand with those leaders, even though no president has ever marched in a protest rally overseas. Ever. But this president is, for some reason, held to a different standard than the 43 previous chief executives. It's about "optics" they say. I often agree with that criticism and I agree that optics are important -- except for the fact that no other president has been responsible for creating similar optics.

There's another layer to this fracas. While lionizing the world leaders who marched in Paris, allegedly in support of Charlie Hebdo and free speech, critics of the president are neglecting two very important points.

1) British Prime Minister David Cameron, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and French President Francois Hollande weren't actually marching with the demonstrators. Their participation was staged on an empty street surrounded by security and merely photographed to look like it was part of the broader rally. It wasn't.


PHOTO: World leaders pretending to march in Paris.

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2) Take a guess at how many of the nations represented by those leaders have statutes protecting satire as free speech? Not one. Indeed, there's only one western nation where satire is protected speech. It's the United States. Thanks to the Supreme Court's unanimous decision in Hustler Magazine, Inc. v. Falwell, Americans can't be sued by other Americans for producing satire against public figures -- regardless of whether the satire describes Jerry Falwell having incestuous sex or whether Saturday Night Live lampoons the president. They can try to sue, but the suit will never see the light of day.

So, while we're applauding those 40 leaders for marching in a staged photo-op in support of a satirical magazine, bear in mind that none of those leaders come from nations where satirical speech is protected. In David Cameron's England, for example, the prime minister or any public figure can sue cartoonists, writers, filmmakers or the producers of an SNL-style sketch show for making fun of them on television or elsewhere, and those lawsuits can actually be adjudicated and the plaintiffs can win. The same is true across the European Union and absolutely throughout the Middle East. President Abbas marched in Paris on Sunday, but a satirist in Gaza has been jailed for poking fun at the Palestinian leader.

Even if we concede that Obama should have attended (in spite of zero precedent along those lines), let's bear in mind that the U.S., for all its faults, leads the world in protected speech -- especially and most importantly satirical speech. We literally walk the walk. Perhaps now that Cameron, Merkel, Hollande and the others are done pretending to march, they'll set about the task of passing legislation to protect satirists in their home nations. Otherwise, their participation in the Paris march was hollow and meaningless. Optics be damned.