GOP's Latino Outreach Continues: Michele Bachmann Proposes 100% Tax On Migrant Workers

Bachmann today came out in support of a 100 percent tax on all money sent from undocumented workers to their families in Central America.
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Bachmann today came out in support of a 100 percent tax on all money sent from undocumented workers to their families in Central America.
Bachmann

You might recall that certain faction of the GOP supports abolishing a menu of government departments and agencies, including the Internal Revenue Service. You might also recall how the GOP in general supports lower taxes and smaller government. And you might recall how Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-MN) proudly endorses all of these positions.

A little over a year ago, Bachmann told reporters, "The IRS should be abolished. We need a new tax system, I'd prefer to see either a straight flat tax or a consumption tax known as the fair tax. Government is too big, and it's getting even bigger. That's what the problem is." She also recently supported the effort to de-fund the entire executive branch, which happens to include the U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services agency of Homeland Security.

Nevertheless, Bachmann came out today in support of a 100 percent tax on all money sent from undocumented workers to their families in Central America. That's right a 100 percent tax -- all of it.

“What I believe we should do is have a 100 percent tax on remittances, the money that illegal aliens send back to these countries.” Bachmann explained. “We would have phone call from the president of these countries in five minutes saying, ‘What can we do? We want to keep this money flowing into our economy.”

I don't think this is the kind of Latino outreach the GOP meant to pursue after the 2012 election.

Interesting, isn't it, that someone who's so vocally anti-tax also believes that migrant workers -- the poorest of the poor in some cases -- should be subjected to a 100 percent tax. How does propose this tax will be collected without an IRS? Does she plan to do it herself with the help of a gaggle of pot-bellied weekend warriors from the Minnesota chapter of the Minuteman club? She doesn't say. Of course.

Then again, since the IRS and the executive branch haven't been abolished yet, perhaps the IRS and the USCIS could handle collecting money being transferred to Central America by the roughly three million migrant workers inside the U.S. -- that is if the IRS and USCIS were greatly expanded with new staffers and perhaps a new sub-agency tasked with the Herculean assignment. So much for reducing the size of government.

Yes, too many Republicans are anti-tax, except when it comes to 47 percent of Americans (senior citizens, military veterans, young people, the unemployed or underemployed) who don't make enough money to pay into the system. Now add migrant workers into the mix and it's become increasingly obvious that the GOP is pro-tax for everyone except the super-rich.