Glenn Beck's Moment of Clarity: "Liberals, You Were Right."

Glenn Beck sets himself apart from other conservatives because he's not afraid to say, "My bad."
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Glenn Beck sets himself apart from other conservatives because he's not afraid to say, "My bad."
Beck

Glenn Beck has long been a fringe figure on the right, which as difficult as it is to do these days, is saying something. But in a weird way I've always respected Beck's occasional unpredictability with regard to certain issues like gay marriage, as well as his talent as an extraordinary infotainer. Crazy as he sounds sometimes, he's far more endearing than a one-dimensional GOP mouthpiece like Sean Hannity.

So it really isn't that much of a surprise that Beck has completely distinguished himself from the seemingly never-ending roster of conservatives who touted the disastrous Iraq war who now have the audacity to blame President Obama for the fallout.

On his radio show Tuesday, Beck addressed the deteriorating situation in Iraq, which Mediaite had a partial transcript of:

"From the beginning, most people on the left were against going into Iraq. I wasn’t. At the time I believed that the United States was under threat from Saddam Hussein. I really truly believed that Saddam Hussein was funding terrorists...

"Now, in spite of the things I felt at the time when we went into war, liberals said: We shouldn’t get involved. We shouldn’t nation-build. And there was no indication the people of Iraq had the will to be free. I thought that was insulting at the time. Everybody wants to be free. They said we couldn’t force freedom on people. Let me lead with my mistakes. You are right. Liberals, you were right. We shouldn’t have."

For all his bluster and posturing, Beck is fundamentally someone who's not afraid to say, "My bad." Earlier this year he told Megyn Kelly on Fox News about his time at the network:

"I remember it as an awful lot of fun and that I made an awful lot of mistakes, and I wish I could go back and be more uniting in my language," Beck said during an interview with Megyn Kelly. "I think I played a role, unfortunately, in helping tear the country apart and it's not who we are."

It's easy to dismiss Beck's sincerity when he makes statements like this, but just making them constitutes a heresy on the right. As we've seen with current Iraq crisis, most conservatives are wholly incapable of dealing with reality and admitting they were wrong.