The Ex-House Stenographer Who Went on That Religious Rant Last October Says She's Completely Sane

On Saturday, Dianne Reidy and her husband posted a 38-minute-long video to YouTube where she "explains" herself. And by that I mean she claims that she didn't have a nervous breakdown and didn't completely lose her mind.
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On Saturday, Dianne Reidy and her husband posted a 38-minute-long video to YouTube where she "explains" herself. And by that I mean she claims that she didn't have a nervous breakdown and didn't completely lose her mind.
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Remember last October when one of the most shameful and reckless political standoffs in the history of this country wrapped up almost perfectly with a bizarre outburst on the floor of the House? If you need a refresher, it was the end of the 2013 shutdown, with the House having just voted to raise the debt ceiling and reopen the U.S. government after the GOP took the global economy hostage, when House stenographer Dianne Reidy stepped up to the mic and began ranting about God and the Freemasons and the Constitution and how American can't serve two masters. She was quickly escorted out of the room and in the days after talked about how she was moved by the Holy Spirit to make the unhinged statement she did on the floor, with the entire nation watching.

Well, she's back. Sort of. On Saturday, Dianne Reidy and her husband posted a 38-minute-long video to YouTube where she "explains" herself further. And by that I mean she claims that she didn't have a nervous breakdown and didn't completely lose her mind, she simply knew that God had a message that he wanted to convey to the United States and that she was the vessel for him to speak. Reidy says that by the time she grabbed the mic on the House floor, God had spoken to her four times. What's fascinating about this is that as you watch Reidy and her husband speak you're struck by how normal they seem. Sure, they're Pentacostals, hence the religious ranting and the rattling off of scripture as if from memory, but you'd probably never peg them for believing lunatic horseshit like the idea that the creator of the universe has chosen to use them as mouthpieces to bring his word to the United States.

Dianne Reidy says she's completely sane. And what's sad is that in our culture -- in America, circa 2014 -- there are technically millions of people who would agree with her. She's not, though -- she's not sane at all. Not by a long-shot.