Nobody Expects Scientologist Kirstie Alley To Win a Twitter Fight with Eric Idle

Eric Idle is a comedy legend. Kirstie Alley is a dumbshit Scientologist who couldn’t even play a completely emotionless character without screwing it up. Need we say more?

A couple of days ago Idle posted a warning on Twitter to anyone who was thinking about visiting an apparent Monty Python online dating site, saying that it was actually run by someone involved in Scientology.

Screen Shot 2014-01-24 at 10.24.02 AM

Kirstie Alley took offense and responded by wiping the fried chicken grease off her fingers and banging them against her computer keyboard repeatedly.

Screen Shot 2014-01-24 at 10.24.58 AM

Idle’s reaction? Wait for it…

Screen Shot 2014-01-24 at 10.25.55 AM

And just for good measure:

Screen Shot 2014-01-24 at 10.26.51 AM

Because, see, Scientology is fucking ridiculous — and Eric Idle is not.

  • David Bofinger

    Idle was absolutely right to say the Monty Python dating site had nothing to do with Monty Python. One could argue, though, that mentioning the religion of the owner was gratuitous. If Idle had said, “… is run by a Jew”, how would that have affected this conversation?

    I think the main lesson of this conversation is that 140 characters is too short for coherent arguments.

    I also think you’re being a bit harsh on Alley’s acting, especially in Wrath of Khan. She was way better than her replacement in the next movie.

  • Seth Thomas Howell

    “Kirstie Alley is a dumbshit Scientologist who couldn’t even play a completely emotionless character without screwing it up.”– while i agree with the article entirely, to be fair, the character of Saavik is half Vulcan, Half Romulan. She was found (on Romulas, i believe) as a child by Spock, living on her own, as her half-breed status was enough for her to be shunned by even her own mother. Spock then took her in as a student, and sponsored her admission to Starfleet Academy. Romulans and Vulcans are distant cousins as species go, and while both posses emotions, Vulcan’s are simply better at hiding them. sorry, I know this is way off topic, but as a Star Trek geek, I had to break it down. Live long, and prosper.

  • JozefAL

    For the record, Chez, Saavik was NOT supposed to be a “completely emotionless character.” There is supposedly a line of dialogue that was edited from ST2 which would’ve established the canonicity of Saavik’s being HALF-ROMULAN (as developed in several non-canonical novels) and, apparently was the basis for Alley’s performance in the role and you’d think that if the DIRECTOR had any objections to Alley’s failing to be a “completely emotionless character,” he would’ve told her to act differently, but he didn’t. BUT, even if you ignore that notion, the simple fact is that Vulcans, as a species are NOT “completely emotionless”–that simple fact was first explored in the original series episode, “Amok Time,” which explained the concept of pon farr. Spock also shows emotions in a few other episodes, usually while under some outside influence: “This Side of Paradise” where Spock becomes very emotional under the influence of some flower spores (he even laughs at one point); or “All Our Yesterdays” when he and McCoy are transported thousands of years in the past (McCoy speculates that Spock’s reverting to the same state of behavior that Vulcans of that era exhibited since it was before the era of Surak). And, of course, let’s not forget why Spock was on Vulcan at the beginning of “Star Trek: The Motion Picture”–he was there to undergo the ritual of kolinahr, by which he would purge ALL emotions. How can you purge something if it doesn’t exist? (And on that movie, I believe that there’s a scene where Spock sheds a tear or two. Hardly what you expect of a “completely emotionless” species.).

    Now, if you want to attack Alley for her Scientology beliefs, that’s fine. But it’s really a bit insulting to attack her for her weight (“responded by wiping the fried chicken grease off her fingers”), especially as her weight issues have been a matter of public record for many years. Now, granted, there are a lot of jokes made about the weight of a lot of men (more frequently in the political arena than in the entertainment business) but, conversely, there’s much less of a tendency to base a man’s worth or importance on his physical appearance as there is to do with a woman (regardless of the business).

    (And I’m probably going to get another “Just stop reading me” whine from Chez, but I don’t care. I read–and comment on–what I want to.)

    • Christopher Foxx

      Spock is, cononically, half human. So using him as an example of Vulcans having emotions is inaccurate.

      However, Surak *is* a full-blooded Vulcan and, as shown in the TNG episode “Sarek“, does possess emotions. As he nears the end of his life and his control falters we see that Vulcans most certainly do have emotions, but hold them in check.

      Which really shouldn’t come a s surprise since throughout the various Trek series the various Vulcans have all shown emotion, in their actions if not their demeanors. Stonn’s jealousy of Spock and T’Pring’s desire to not be Spock’s mate in “Amok Time”. Surak’s cry to “Get them back!!” when communications are lost in “The Voyage Home”. Just to three examples.

      (Try and out-geek me, will you?)

      • http://vermillionbrain.blogspot.com/ Vermillion

        I should have known someone would have risen to the challenge. Geek away, good sir.

      • Temmere

        Surak was the ancient Vulcan philosopher who established the whole “control your emotions” way of life for his people. The human Admiral Cartwright was the one who shouted “Get him back!” when communications were disrupted in ST4.

        • Christopher Foxx

          >blush< Shame on me. I already noticed and fixed the Surak/Sarek typo (which is all that was), but the Sarek/Cartwright mix is embarrassing. Thanks for the correction.

  • http://www.osborneink.com OsborneInk

    Hi, this comment is from the $cientology Movement. We aren’t as well-known as L. Ron Hubbard’s religion, but we are not ourselves a religion. Instead, we try to raise awareness of his scam by lobbying journalists and writers to use the dollar sign whenever they type the word “$cientology.” Chez, will you please commit to this worthy endeavor?

  • Douglas D. Douglas

    Eric Idle didn’t even “attack” Scientology in his original tweet. He said to beware of a phony site run by a Scientologist. Kirstie decided to shoot first and aim after, and ended up neatly filleted, cooked and served up cold by a master chef.

  • D_C_Wilson

    You’d think even a dimwit like Alley would know better than to tee up that line for a Python.
    Beautifully done, Mr. Idle.

  • CL Nicholson

    Any religion that considers ‘Battlefield Earth’ sacred text deserves some side eye. As a person of faith, you have to learn to take a few jokes at your own expense. I’m a Methodist, married to a Catholic who LOL’s everytime I watch “life of Bryan” and “Dogma”. Hasn’t stop me from going to church everyone Sunday.

    If a retired British comic can cause you to lose your bowel control because he made a tweet about your faith – your faith isn’t worth that much.

    • maximillio

      “Any religion that considers ‘Battlefield Earth’ sacred text deserves some side eye”
      LOL. That was the second-worst science fiction novel I ever read. To this day, I’m wondering what impelled me to even finish that piece of dreck.
      L. Ron didn’t know dick about science. His command of fundamental scientific principles was about as realistic as a 1950′s comic book. And he didn’t know dick about writing either. He called his 10-volume series a “satire,” although the only thing being satirized was the author’s own feeble effort at being humorous, or even relevant. Wow.

      • David L.

        Which one was the worst? (science fiction novel you’ve ever read, I mean). Sometimes knowing which books to avoid is as valuable as a good book recommendation…

      • Norbrook

        The movie was worse. I watched back when it was released to video as one of my “free rentals,” and felt seriously ripped off. These days, if I were a masochist, I’d probably pirate it and still feel ripped off.

  • lucille austero

    Scientology treats Kirstie Alley like a movie star, and I’d be willing to bet that’s all she cares about. She is more than willing to pay for the adulation from the Cherch of Scientology.

  • DamOTclese2

    It’s amusing, Kirstie Alley is aware that Scientology is at core organized crime, rooking and swindling money from the rubes, marks, and suckers that still hand their money to the syndicate. And yet she can’t just walk away because then she would have no fame, and even fame as a dimwitted idiot is still fame, of sorts.

  • lucille austero

    Scientology is a dangerous cult. Google it. They are not just silly, harmless celebs like Ms. Alley.

    • D_C_Wilson

      Kirstie Alley has worked to discourage people with mental health issues from pursuing effective treatments. There’s nothing “harmless” about her.

      • Unex Skcus

        ^ Yep, there’s nothing “harmless” about Co$.