Astonishing Statistics On Wealth Divide Revealed Ahead of Davos

As the World Economic Forum starts in Davos, a recent report from the charity Oxfam highlighted the astonishing global wealth divide that now exists between the super rich and super poor.
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As the World Economic Forum starts in Davos, a recent report from the charity Oxfam highlighted the astonishing global wealth divide that now exists between the super rich and super poor.
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As the World Economic Forum starts in Davos, a recent report from the charity Oxfam highlighted the astonishing global wealth divide that now exists between the super rich and super poor. Reports the Guardian:

The extent to which so much global wealth has become corralled by a virtual handful of the so-called 'global elite' is exposed in a new report from Oxfam on Monday. It warned that those richest 85 people across the globe share a combined wealth of £1tn, as much as the poorest 3.5 billion of the world's population.

Winnie Byanyima, the Oxfam executive director, stated:

"In developed and developing countries alike we are increasingly living in a world where the lowest tax rates, the best health and education and the opportunity to influence are being given not just to the rich but also to their children...

"Without a concerted effort to tackle inequality, the cascade of privilege and of disadvantage will continue down the generations. We will soon live in a world where equality of opportunity is just a dream. In too many countries economic growth already amounts to little more than a 'winner takes all' windfall for the richest."

The Guardian report continues:

Oxfam report found that over the past few decades, the rich have successfully wielded political influence to skew policies in their favour on issues ranging from financial deregulation, tax havens, anti-competitive business practices to lower tax rates on high incomes and cuts in public services for the majority. Since the late 1970s, tax rates for the richest have fallen in 29 out of 30 countries for which data are available, said the report.

One of the most troubling aspects of this wealth inequality is the stunning lack of knowledge about it, particularly in the US, a fact highlighted in this much shared youtube clip: