The Tea Party and Ted Cruz Getting Ready for ‘Shutdown: The Sequel’

ted_cruz_shutdown_sequel

The schadenfreude wore off quickly. Observing the tea party suffer a political defeat, with other Republicans like Rep. Pete King (R-NY) and Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) piling on, was entertaining for a solid 24 hours until the grim realization set in that this rogue faction of the GOP could very well try for a sequel — or an entire series of shutdowns.

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), the chief architect of the tea party shutdown and subsequent debt ceiling brinksmanship, might have lost an endorsement from his home town newspaper, but he managed to raise $1.19 million during the third quarter — nearly three times the haul of the second quarter total. That period of time didn’t include the shutdown, but it included his filibuster, which, it turns out, had a very important purpose: the make money for Ted Cruz. He also beefed up his email database with a petition that gathered over two million names and addresses.

When asked who “won” the shutdown battle, Rep. Tom Rooney (R-FL) told Politico the winners were “the people that managed to raise a lot of money off this.” Now, I don’t know if that means the tea party necessarily “won,” but Cruz and the Heritage Action group, which pulled in $330,000, didn’t walk away empty-handed.

While Cruz and the others cashed-in, the shutdown ended up costing the federal government $24 billion. Via TIME, here’s a breakdown of just a few of the losses:

-About $3.1 billion in lost government services, according to the research firm IHS
-$152 million per day in lost travel spending, according to the U.S. Travel Association
-$76 million per day lost because of National Parks being shut down, according to the National Park Service
-$217 million per day in lost federal and contractor wages in the Washington D.C. metropolitan area alone

And we’re supposed to continue buying the line that the tea party cares about government spending and the national debt? That’s rich.

In spite of the losses, we should expect this to happen all over again anyway. First, on and before January 15 when the newly signed continuing resolution expires, and again on and before February 7 when the debt ceiling will need to be raised again. Incidentally, the State of the Union is scheduled for January 28 — a massive PR opportunity for the Obama administration, thus further weakening tea party leverage in the event of another shutdown.

During a Fox News Channel interview, Ted Cruz refused to rule out another round of shenanigans:

KARL: So you would do it again?

CRUZ: I would do anything, and I will to do anything I can to stop the train wreck that is Obamacare.

Again, I have to ask: if Obamacare is a trainwreck with an approval of 38 percent, what kind of wreck is the tea party with an approval of 21 percent? The interview continued:

KARL: So you might do it?

CRUZ: What I intend to do is continue to stand with American people to stop Obamacare.

Meanwhile, Rep. John Flemming (R-LA) told the New York Times, “I’ll vote against it… But that will get us into Round 2. See, we’re going to start this all over again.”

It’s difficult to fully encapsulate in words the dangerous repercussions of the whimsical, nihilistic behavior of this faction. American politics and government hinges upon a basic respect for certain unwritten rules and traditions. The tea party, as we’ve witnessed for years and most prominently this month, is actively engaged in a contemptuous effort to rewrite those rules. We’ve witnessed signs of this trend early on when yokels like Rep. Joe Wilson (R-SC) shouted “You lie!” at the president during a prime time joint session address. We’ve seen it when tea party members of Congress embraced Birthers and endorsed wild conspiracy theories. And since 2011, the brinksmanship with the debt ceiling has allowed a small, fringe congressional minority to not only have a staggeringly loud voice but also to be granted latitude to shove the entire economy to the edge of disaster in the name of its pet peeves and political action committees.

Perhaps in January and February it’ll be about the birth control provisions of the Affordable Care Act. Perhaps they’ll try to de-fund the entire law once again — knowing full-well it’ll never happen. As long as the money continues to flow, the tea party will continue to monkey with the system. The GOP establishment is the only group that can put a stop to it by marginalizing its influencs, if not entirely hacking off the limb.

Bob Cesca is the managing editor for The Daily Banter, the editor of BobCesca.com, the host of the Bubble Genius Bob & Chez Show podcast and a Huffington Post contributor.

  • bartskid1

    The GOP just gutted 5 Billion to feed kids, then they wasted 23 billion on a blackmail scheme that didn’t work,(shutdown). This economy wrecking shutdown cost more jobs and hurt our credit rating which all added even more debt than the 23 billion they wasted..(plus the 3 billion McConnell demanded for a dam in Kentucky during that blackmail vote).
    Congress has not taxed one single penny to the record breaking amount of money corporation have raked in. These same Corporations that makes billions and pays zero in taxes, also pays so little to it’s workers, that we taxpayers have to support them too.
    When does the hundreds of billions of taxpayer dollars for corporate welfare and their employees support end? How much longer do too many American’s keep their heads up their butts, because a “Party that no longer is the same”..is more important to them then their countries peoples or actual facts?
    The world is laughing at us! Between our corporate owned medias total lack of integrity or substance and an almost proudly ignorant Tea Party, is it already too late to stop the United States of America from becoming the United Corporate owned States?

  • kfreed

    If you thought you were disgusted before, watch this Ted Cruz and Rand Paul video… must see to believe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=7q3fyBC4HFo

  • Jo Clark

    The House can do in Jan/Feb exactly what it did to end this last shutdown. Band together with Dems and send a strong, clear, FINAL message to Cruz and his band of turds. If they don’t marginalize the tea party faction, they’re doomed as a party.

  • DHFabian

    But this worked so well with President Clinton! The first time they threatened a shutdown, Clinton threw the very poor (single adults, often ill/unemployable) off the cliff. The next time, he threw impoverished families off the cliff. Next, he at least began similarly “reforming” Social Security, starting with the disabled. President Obama is sure no Bill Clinton — thank goodness!

  • kfreed

    Before collapsing from sheer exhaustion, I asked somewhere on the Intertoobz just the other day why everyone has been acting all surpirsed at the Tea Party’s latest lunacy when it’s been going on since the 2010 Tea Party takeover (since 2009 actually).

    Moreover, why would anyone assume they’ve learned their lesson and will just give it up? Not a chance in hell. Maddow finally put together a piece demonstrating this:

    “Rachel Maddow: Republican Shutdown Planned For Two Years (VIDEO)”
    http://www.addictinginfo.org/2013/10/01/rachel-maddow-republican-shutdown-evil-planned-video/

  • Victor_the_Crab

    Go ahead teabagging assholes. Do this all over again in a couple of months time, and closer to the midterm elections. This is how the American public will react to your latest round of asshattery:

  • Kenia Brittney Armstrong

    Make the Republicans pay for three wars, The 23 billion dollars the lost during the shutdown, and tell “Goofy”, you’re just a paid loudmouth. As soon as you lose another battle, you’ll be seeing the United States from Canada.

  • Morey Hamstercram

    Let’s stop pretending we don’t know what’s going on, OK? Bush blew out the Clinton surplus in 7 months and ran up the debt (on purpose) to give Republicans an excuse to kill entitlements. Casus belli. This is their last chance. If they don’t do it under President Obama, it won’t get done. That’s why it looks like a suicide mission. Because it is.

  • Morey Hamstercram

    Giggity giggity.

  • feloniousgrammar

    The bill that was just passed to open the government and raise the debt ceiling including a little item that raises the debt ceiling automatically. They’ll have to successfully vote against it in order to get what they want. I surmise that there’s a mix of Tea Party Congresspersons who don’t get that and others who do, but this charade is a real moneymaker.

    • D_C_Wilson

      They used to call that “Gephardt Rule.” Newt dropped it as one of his first actions as Speaker. And gee, that’s when we started having these major shutdowns.

  • DrowningKittens

    Why am I not surprised the Party of Blame figured out a way to “lose money” while closed? First, money not spent is not money lost. Second, the money was previously pulled out of the economy in taxes Third, in general, the government doesn’t generate what hasn’t already been generated. In other words, in the business of running a nation, the government is overhead, the private sector is profit.

    • stacib23

      Although I think this entire post is massively stupid, what in the hell does this mean?

      Third, in general, the government doesn’t generate what hasn’t already been generated.

      • condew

        Tea Party and Libertarian types don’t believe work done for a government paycheck is real work. So, if a contractor works next to a government employee doing the same work for a higher salary, the contractor is highly productive even though paid more, and the government worker is worthless. This is why they think throwing away the productivity of 800,000 federal workers for over two weeks doesn’t cost anything. Libertarians always have this arrogant “My work is highly valuable, your work isn’t worth shit” attitude.

        • Morey Hamstercram

          Partly because when Bush was president there was a massive runup in public sector jobs which the Republicans killed when Obama was elected. So they’ve got to pretend they were just shifting around boxes in a warehouse. Because what they really did is reprehensible and immoral.

        • Pink No More

          Libertarians always have this arrogant “I am highly valuable, you aren’t worth shit” attitude.

          Fixed.

        • DrowningKittens

          The difference is motivation. In general, the private sector fights to keep their job everyday while the public sector doesn’t worried about jobs that they can’t even be fired from.

          • kfreed

            The private sector sheds jobs continuously in an effort to increase annual profits for shareholders. Not to mention all those manufactureing jobs that have been shipped overseas to filled by sweatshop labor.

          • DrowningKittens

            I would agree with most of this too. Life was so much better when the owner was two doors down the hall instead of 2000 miles away and 20 stories up.

          • kfreed

            LOL. I doubt it. You’re doing the same thing every Libertarian douche does…

          • DrowningKittens

            What’s that?

          • kfreed

            Lies his face off/refuses to confront reality.

          • DrowningKittens

            Well, it’s a good thing I don’t have anything to do with that.

    • feloniousgrammar

      Federal money spent is money put into motion in the economy. It’s money spent on car payments, paying bills, rent, mortgages, groceries, clothes, entertainment… Federal spending is Federal paying— which includes hiring— and money moves. The Federal Budget isn’t a zero sum game.

      Many private sector businesses contract with the government. They have more “overhead” because they make profit, especially the publicly traded companies that pay CEOs and shareholders. Republicans and Libertarians want the American taxpayer to pay more for government services by farming them out to more private businesses.

      • Treading_Water

        The military used to do it’s own cooking and cleaning, it’s own vehicle maintenance and driving, and now it’s all farmed out to companies like KBR who overcharge and outright defraud the government while doing a poor job fulfilling it’s contracts. If Gomer Pyle could peel potatoes, why can’t that job be something our modern army does for itself?

        • feloniousgrammar

          I do want to see that rectified. Aside from the fleecing that is war-profiteering and the poor service and products delivered, including soldiers dying from electrocution in the showers in a combat zone, it robs the soldiers of opportunities to bond over more than just warfare and to have more of a hand in the co-creation of their community. Domestic duties are grounding, unifying, and provide more varieties of duties in their days.

      • DrowningKittens

        Federal money spent in the economy is not a function of government, it is a by product. It is not a business model. The Federal Budget is a negative zero game. Money coming in results in less money coming out. And we lose $24 billion a month for that privilege.

        • kfreed

          Um… are you the one down-voting everyone’s comments?

          • DrowningKittens

            Not all of them. Just the ones that I think earned it.

          • kfreed

            Figured it was you going down the line down-voting without actually reading anything:)

          • DrowningKittens

            I never vote without reading it first. I’ve sprinkled my fair share around my replies here, but I’m not the only person on the internet either.

          • kfreed

            I know that’s a lie. I barely finished updating some very lenghthy comments containing several links and you were immediately available to down-vote. Not that it does you any good:)

          • DrowningKittens

            Don’t flatter yourself. It was the same garbage as before. And I suppose you’re not counting the two I agreed with, are you? Or is once a pattern?

          • kfreed

            Don’t try to bullshit me. You’re a Paultard bagger spouting nonsense Ron Paul “Libertarian” tripe, trying to pretend you’re not a right-winger.

            Perusing your comment history is a hoot, BTW.

          • DrowningKittens

            Oh, I’m right wing. I’m a Conservative and I support the Tea Party. That’s why I’m commenting on this article. That should help you focus your hate better.

          • kfreed

            First honest comment you’ve ever posted. Thanks:)

          • DrowningKittens

            So it’s only a lie if you disagree. Got it.

          • kfreed

            A lie is a lie is a lie.

    • D_C_Wilson

      Taxes don’t pull money of the economy. The money is spent on salaries and expenses. The people, both government employees and contractors, spend the money they receive on groceries, clothing, utilities. etc. This returns the money to the private sector economy and has a multiplier effect.

      Do you know what those government employees weren’t doing while the government was shut down? They weren’t spending. During the shut down, money was not flowing through the economy.

      Why do you think states were so keen to pony up some temporary funds to reopen national monuments like the Statue of Liberty? Because when people go to New York to see the Statue or Liberty, they stay in hotels, they eat in restaurants, they buy souvenirs. The states were losing more in tourist dollars that it cost them to reopen the monuments.

      • DrowningKittens

        Aside from the taxes, you just laid out the principles of supply side economics. Isn’t that being used to blame Bush for our current economic woes?

        Overall, I wouldn’t object to your point if this wasn’t tax money that is being over spent and turned into debt which in turn incurs interest. Lost in all of this the $24 billion a month in interest payments that no one ever mentions. Now that’s lost money!

        • D_C_Wilson

          No, supply side economics is about giving tax breaks to the people who are least likely to spend that money and grow the economy: Millionaires.

          • DrowningKittens

            If that’s the case, then why is Obama sliding $3 billion a day to Wall Street?

          • D_C_Wilson

            Because sadly, Wall Street has this country by the balls and they know it.

          • DrowningKittens

            That makes no sense. Obama’s highest corporate taxes in the world have forced the rich to shovel this money into off shore accounts at record levels. It’s the worst of both worlds.

          • D_C_Wilson

            News flash: Obama doesn’t set the tax rates. Congress does. And in any event, taxes today are still lower than they were during the Reagan era, so your claim is the one that makes no sense.

          • DrowningKittens

            I didn’t say Obama sets taxes. The US has the top corporate tax rate in the world. And I like the way your blame conveniently vacillates between Congress and Reagan on the same issue.

          • D_C_Wilson

            I didn’t say Obama sets taxes.

            Bullshit. Your exact words:

            Obama’s highest corporate taxes

            You were clearly stating that the tax rates were set by him, even though the corporate tax rate hasn’t even been raised since he became president.

            The actual rate, however, is pretty meaningless. Our tax laws are so riddled with loopholes that no corporation actually pays the full rate. Any that do should fire their entire accounting staff immediately. In fact, many of the biggest corporations, like GE, often pay no taxes for the year.

            I, other hand, never said anything about Reagan setting the tax rate. I said they were the taxes “during the Reagan era” not that he personally set them,

            Nice try, though.

          • DrowningKittens

            It’s a reference like “Bush’s tax cuts” because it happened on his watch. Never mind that this has practically nothing to do with my original point. Continue to avoid the elephant in the room by splitting hairs on his back.

          • D_C_Wilson

            Do you know why they were called “Bush’s tax cuts”? Because he made them the centerpiece of his campaign and his first term.
            Your original point was based on a false premise, which I’ve already explained to you, so don’t cry that no one is taking your disengenuous attempts to deflect the conversation seriously.

          • DrowningKittens

            Y’all must have the worst case of frizzles on the planet. I’ve have never seen a board that splits more hairs than this one.

          • D_C_Wilson

            Well, if you don’t like discussing facts, here’s the exit ramp:
            redstate.com

          • DrowningKittens

            The US has the highest corporate taxes in the world and they occurred on Obama’s watch. Does that work for you? My argument is still the same without that so called premise:
            1. In general, QE3 is being funneled to Wall Street at around $3 billion a day.
            2. Money is being dumped into off shore tax havens in record amounts.
            3. Money that is suppose to be stimulating the economy through investments is actually keeping the market artificially high while most of the money is being buried in off shore tax havens.

          • D_C_Wilson

            The US has the highest corporate taxes in the world and they occurred on Obama’s watch. Does that work for you?

            No, because the corporate tax rate hasn’t been changed “on Obama’s watch.”

          • DrowningKittens

            Right, but Japan dropped theirs on Obama’s watch, which sent us past them.

          • D_C_Wilson

            Wow. So now you’re blaming Obama because Japan lowered their corporate tax rate?

            Do you just not understand that no corporation in the US actually pays the top rate?

          • DrowningKittens

            “Blaming”? “Pays”? Neither is implied or inferred. Employ some critical thinking skills and try again.

          • D_C_Wilson

            I tried. But every time I do, your posts just look like nonsense.

            BTW, I think you should look up the definition of “inferred.”

            Have a nice day.

          • DrowningKittens

            I know what you mean. And thanks. It’s been another awesome day here in South Texas. Hope you’re having the same. (Btw, “inferred” is exactly what I meant to say.)

          • kfreed

            If you recall, Dubya was the one behind the Wall Street bailout. By the time of the 2008 economic crisis, it had already been a Bush family tradition:

            Bank Bailouts – A Bush Family Legacy: S&L Crisis bank bailout cost to taxpayers is 200 billion over three decades

            Time (1989): Daddy Bush says “Share the Pain” – Sound Familiar?
            http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,957083,00.html

            Neil Bush and the $1 Billion Silverado Debacle
            (S&L Crisis)

            Time (Oct. 1990):
            http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,971274,00.html

          • DrowningKittens

            I would agree with almost all of that Kfreed. But none of that has any bearing on what I said.

          • kfreed

            Yes it does… actually.

          • DrowningKittens

            No it doesn’t.

        • kfreed

          So you’re not up on Supply Side economics either? Color me shocked.

          • DrowningKittens

            The point is that Liberals love to complain about money they didn’t get to spend.

          • kfreed

            The point is that the Tea Party is nuts… Ted Cruz and Rand Paul have a message for you: https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=7q3fyBC4HFo

            I cannot take anyone who supports this seriously – nor should any sane person on the planet.

          • DrowningKittens

            Then why are you obsessed with making pointless replies to almost every comment I make? I bring up a monthly $24 billion interest payment and you want to talk about a thumb down in the comments. Sheesh.

    • Morey Hamstercram

      Ted Cruz and his teabagger friends gave 800,000 federal employees a two-week paid vacation. What a great bunch of fiscal conservatives.

      • DrowningKittens

        That’s because Senator Cruz took care of the Pawns of War that Obama marched out for punishment.

        • Morey Hamstercram

          “That’s because Senator Cruz took care of the Pawns of War that Obama marched out for punishment.”

          Sorry, I don’t know what that means. It sounds like gibberish to me. To be fair, I don’t speak teabagger.

        • kfreed

          You’re going to have to school us on the latest Tea Bag talking point. We don’t know what you’re talking about.

          The Tea Partying Libertarian Koch-funded Cato “Pawns of War”? or the “Orchestraters of War”?

          “Fact: The Cato Institute’s actual record during the Bush administration years was anything but principled and far from heroic.

          John Yoo, author of the notorious “torture memo,” served on the Cato editorial board for Cato Supreme Court Review
          during the Bush presidency. At the same time, Yoo was writing the Bush administration’s legal justifications for waterboarding, Guantánamo, warrantless wiretapping and more. Yoo also contributed articles to Cato Supreme Court Review and a chapter to a Cato book titled The Rule of Law in the Wake of Clinton criticizing President Clinton’s “imperial presidency.”

          The “Cato Policy Report” attacked progressive critics of Bush’s “War on Terror” as “Terrorism’s Fellow Travelers“
          in its November/December 2001 issue. Former Vice President of Research Brink Lindsey wrote, “Most of the America haters flushed out by September 11 are huddled on the left wing of the conventional political spectrum.”

          Another Cato executive, Ted Galen Carpenter, former VP for defense and foreign policy studies, enthusiastically supported Bush’s “war on terror” and called on Bush to invade Pakistan.

          The Cato Institute advised the 2002–04 Republican-dominated Congress to commence military strikes in Pakistan in its Cato Handbook for Congress arguing, “Ultimately, Afghanistan becomes less important as a place to conduct military operations in the war on terrorism and more important as a place from which to launch military operations. And those operations should be directed across the border into neighboring Pakistan.”

          Another Cato Institute executive, Roger Pilon, vigorously supported Bush’s attacks on civil liberties. Pilon, Cato’s
          VP for legal affairs and founding director of the Cato Institute’s “Center for Constitutional Studies,” supported expanded FBI wiretapping in 2002 and called on Congress to reauthorize the Patriot Act as late as 2008.

          While it’s true that compared to other pro-Republican think-tanks, Cato did have periods when it was critical of Bush’s wars and attacks oncivil liberties, those attacks weren’t consistent and showed every sign of being subordinated to the Cato Institute’s political demands. The most obvious example of this came in 2005, when Cato suddenly called a
          halt to its growing criticisms of Bush’s “war on terror” and fired one of its most ardent anti-interventionists (another resigned), sparking a backlash from some prominent non-Cato libertarians like antiwar.com’s Justin Raimondo, who wrote:“Now that the majority of Americans have turned against this war, the Cato bigwigs are lining up with the neoconservatives who want to ‘stay the course.’” In 2006, with Bush’s presidency in tatters, Cato restarted its criticism in earnest.

          [Which explains Libertarian Glenn Greenwald of Cato Institute perfectly]
          http://www.thenation.com/article/167500/independent-and-principled-behind-cato-myth

    • Pink No More

      Thanks for the lesson in Repub non-logic, Dr. Stupid!

  • http://drangedinaz.wordpress.com/ IrishGrrrl

    I called it–I said Cruz was doing it all for publicity and money. He wants power for power’s sake and he’s perfectly willing to sacrifice the rest of us to get it.

  • BlueTrooth

    Ted Yoho wasn’t just blabbing a misinformed view of a default as a good thing, it is a firmly held belief by a vast majority of the Tea Party. While many of us can vent and portray confidence by ridiculing these folks, they are dead serious. And…while it is always dangerous to reference Germany in the 30′s, it would benefit average Americans to be reminded of some of the parallels. If you’ve never “experienced” the Tea Party mindset, you have no understanding of just how close America is to a transformation into something entirely different. These are activists that justify THEIR transformation plans by repeating over and over that President Obama has transformed America already and he isn’t finished. Back to the default, though. The primary effect they hope to achieve is hyper-inflation. It is a long-held premise that the Federal Reserve will eventually cause hyper-inflation (because the Libertarian faction is stuck on the idea that our currency isn’t managed but just printed at will). A credit default could very well trigger hyper-inflation and once the ball is rolling, its pretty easy to pick up new desperate converts. Thats just one aspect of the strategy, but I’ll be damned if they didn’t almost pull it off.

    • kfreed

      Thank you.

  • Hugo S LaVia

    A couple million emails? Can we assume that’s about the pull he’d get vote-wise in a presidential election?

    • kfreed

      No, he’d get the entire evangelical wing (values voters) and the Libertarian douchebages (both of which make up the Tea Party), plus a bunch of clueless Republicans who will vote for him just because he has an R next to his name.

  • trgahan

    I think “moderate” republicans are fine with the Tea Party doing what it’s doing. The poll numbers may be in the toilet, but their supporters don’t believe those numbers anyway (Romney landslide!). They are the repressed silient majority, remember?

    They may be currently unable to win a national presidential election, but the 2010 takeover of the states allowed them to solidify an obstructionist base of federal representatives to completely stop ANY potential Democratic president from legislating anywhere left of center right.

    They have figured out how to have power without being in power and all they have to do is wait for the Democrats to run a lame duck candidate for president and they are back in.

    • Vipsanius

      I think that you are right.

    • D_C_Wilson

      Don’t you know that Romney only lost because 10 million conservatives stayed home rather than vote for the RINO. I guess they didn’t hate the Kenyan Usurper as much as they claimed. I’m serious. That’s the new talking point about why the polls were “skewed.”
      2010 enabled them to gerrymander enough districts so that it no longer matters if they get a majority of votes. Most of them are from districts that would elect Jeffrey Dahlmer if he ran as a republican. That’s why they only have to appeal to their narrow base and fuck anyone else. It’s why they can never be too extreme or even extreme enough. They’re only fear is a primary challenger who is even more batshit crazy than they are.

      • feloniousgrammar

        That could be changed with some well-timed white flight.

  • Craig Moffitt

    These crumbs have obviously learned nothing from this experience. But if they insist on closing the government down again, this time in an election year, to paraphrase the President “Please proceed morons”.

  • Badgerite

    I still say that if they pull this again, this time Congress should be the people who do not get paid. And no back pay as well. NO PAY AND NO BACK PAY FOR YOU!

  • mrbrink

    Yeah, if we’re legislating according to the polls and taking a stand against harmful, unpopular things, maybe Ted Cruz should start by defunding his big mouth.

    “Fiscal conservatism” died this week of natural causes and was laid to rest in a $24 billion hole. I spit on its grave.

  • Draxiar

    I’ll admit there’s a part of me that is interested in seeing what life would be like if the Tea Party and hyper conservatives actually took control of the government. Of course I don’t want it to happen but I just want to look into that alternate reality and see the fruition of logical conclusions.

    Which dystopian movie/book would it be most like? Hunger Games? Mad Max? 1984? Elysium?

    • Craig Moffitt

      Idiocracy

      • D_C_Wilson

        Ever read the novel “Snowcrash”?

        • Craig Moffitt

          Yes, though I’m not a fan of Neal Stephenson.

          • D_C_Wilson

            Yeah, he does tend to long-winded, but I think the image he painted in that novel, of people living in franchised, for-profit, gated communities is the wingnut utopia.

      • nathkatun7

        Indeed!

    • D_C_Wilson

      The sad thing is, I can totally see some of these teabaggers getting off on watching poor teenagers kill each other in a bloodsport.

    • trgahan

      Actually, I doubt it would be that spectacular or interesting. I’d say more like William Faulkner’s portrayals of the south or Dos Paso’s early 1900’s northeast is probably a good place to start.

      I’ve always thought that what Republicans really want is what the PRI had in Mexico through the 1970’s and 1980’s. A completely rigged governmental and judicial system, party members completely above reproach, zero social mobility unless allowed BY the party, and 99 percent of the population marginalized, disenfranchised, and too busy fighting over the 5 percent of the national wealth to change the government.

      • JozefAL

        So, trgahan, how then does Mexico in the 1970s and 1980s TRULY differ from how the Soviet Union worked?

        • trgahan

          ah…you lost me…..

      • kfreed

        Hunger Games

    • http://www.politicalruminations.com/ nicole

      >>>there’s a part of me that is interested in seeing what life would be
      like if the Tea Party and hyper conservatives actually took control of
      the government

      Jesus, Drax, bite your tongue……….QUICK!

      Should that occur, I’m headed for a remote island.

      • kfreed

        Make room on that island for me.

    • kfreed

      What would America look like? North Carolina:

      Think Progress: “How One Multi-Millionaire Is Turning North Carolina Into A Tea Party Utopia”
      http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2013/04/08/1832201/meet-the-north-carolina-legislature-the-new-ground-zero-for-tea-party-craziness/

      Forbes: “North Carolina Lawmakers Introduce Law To Establish An Official State Religion”
      http://www.forbes.com/sites/rickungar/2013/04/03/north-carolina-lawmakers-introduce-law-to-establish-an-official-state-religion/

      While I hate linking to anything from Chris Hedges who has gone off the freaking reservation with Obama derangement syndrome (once off the reservation there ain’t no going back), here’s a clue:

      Re: GOP Shutdown: “The Radical Christian Right and the War on Government”
      http://www.opednews.com/articles/The-Radical-Christian-Righ-by-Chris-Hedges-Christian-Right_Government-Bullying_Government-Corruption_Right-Wing-Extremists-131007-879.html#comment455308

  • Vipsanius

    The hotheads are on a mission. They intend to make as much trouble as they can. And, fight to the last. If you ask them what they are fighting for, you will get rhetoric.

  • JozefAL

    It’s just too bad the Federal government can’t sue these Teabagging scum and force THEM to pay back every last dime that THEY cost the government from THEIR shutdown.

  • Alec

    Please do it Tea Party. Please deliver the coup de grace to conservatives for the next two decades..please.

  • That River Gal

    I’ve found a great amount of relief in #renametheteaparty on Twitter tonight.

  • kfreed

    Yep. Let’s not get too comfy. It will never be over until these clowns are thrown out on their shiny red arses. The latest Tea Party email via Tea Party Patriots (also viewable via browser): http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=378811b3c052d40a005861416&id=2aa3b31742&e=abc1a3006b

    “Dear Patriot,

    Last night, the professional politicians in BOTH political parties sold the American people down the river.

    Again.

    “Republican” Mitch McConnell cut a deal with Barack Obama to ram through a massive government spending bill that fully funds Obamacare and hikes the debt ceiling limit.

    And in the process, the D.C. “ruling class” reminded the nation once again why millions and millions of Americans formed the Tea Party movement.

    Please make a generous contribution of $35, $50, $100, $200, or whatever you can afford to help us get back on the political offensive.

    This betrayal must not go unanswered!

    Now more than ever, our movement must recruit and organize so that we have the political clout to prevent more economy-destroying backroom deals like the one that was just passed.

    Next month the Republicans are set to open new negotiations with the White House over spending. Obamacare MUST be on the table. Mitch McConnell and his “Republicans” must not cave again!

    Now more than ever the Tea Party must strike back. The future of our nation is at stake.

    Please help us reach that goal by making the most generous donation you possibly can right away.

    My friend, if we don’t stand up and fight back against the big spenders, who will?”

    http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=378811b3c052d40a005861416&id=2aa3b31742&e=abc1a3006b

  • Kagemusha

    The party of disappearing government is never really disturbed about the results, as long as they’ve accomplished that trick, to some degree – no matter who in the lower 99 gets hurt. As former GOP functionary Mike Lofgren has confirmed, the goal is making government dysfunctional. Even if they look bad doing it, it’s not like they’re actually trying to grow their ranks. Gerry-mandering, voter suppression and corporate tag sales will take care of that.

    A broken government is what they’re after – bunker-mentality, seemingly irrational, funneling the money upward. “See, we told you government doesn’t work. Privatize this.”

    A functioning one will get them nowhere.

    • judi

      What you just wrote………times ten,

    • nathkatun7

      “A broken government is what they’re after – bunker-mentality, seemingly irrational, shoveling the money upward. “See, we told you government doesn’t work. Privatize this.”

      A functioning one will get them nowhere.

      You totally nailed what the tea baggers are all about!

  • That River Gal

    The mantra for the next several months should be that 24 billion stolen from the US economy is not acceptable.

  • Richard_thunderbay

    One definition of insanity is “doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results”, but given that the “thing” in this case was already insane, these guys are obviously looking to take it into a whole new dimension of lunacy.