Ted Cruz's Speechwriter Complains on Twitter About Going on Obamacare; I Help Her With the Math

Amanda Carpenter, speechwriter for Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), went on a Twitter rant about being forced off the government health insurance plan, the Federal Employees Benefit Health Plan, and onto the D.C. Affordable Care Act exchange. Let's help her out with some math, shall we?
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Amanda Carpenter, speechwriter for Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), went on a Twitter rant about being forced off the government health insurance plan, the Federal Employees Benefit Health Plan, and onto the D.C. Affordable Care Act exchange. Let's help her out with some math, shall we?
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Amanda Carpenter, speechwriter for Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX), went on a Twitter rant about being forced off the government health insurance plan, the Federal Employees Benefit Health Plan, and onto the D.C. Affordable Care Act exchange.

Don't thank Obamacare. Thank Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-IA) who introduced the requirement for congressional staffers to go on Obamacare as an amendment during the Affordable Care Act debate.

She might not know, but I happen to know approximately what she'll pay. Carpenter is married with two kids and an annual government salary of around $73,000. I have no idea whether her husband has insurance, nor do I know whether he's employed or what he earns. So we'll leave his status out of the equation. According to the Kaiser insurance subsidy calculator, she'll be able to sign up for a plan in D.C. for $9,707 per year, or $808 per month.

But she'll only have to pay 25 percent of that cost due to the fact that the Office of Personnel Management decided that the government will continue to pay 75 percent of the premium cost for congressional and White House staffers. That makes her out of pocket premium rate around $202 per month, and that not only covers her but also her husband and two kids.

However, if the Vitter amendment, which would've overruled the OPM decision, had passed today she'd have to pay the full $808 per month, which makes the following tweet seem a little odd:

She ought to be complaining about the Vitter amendment. A lot. Weird that she's brushing it off considering how it would've cost her and her family an extra $606 per month.

Anyway, just thought I'd reach across the aisle and help out with some, you know, math.

Bob Cesca is the managing editor for The Daily Banter, the editor of BobCesca.com, the host of the Bubble Genius Bob & Chez Show podcast and a Huffington Post contributor.