Perhaps the Most Infuriatingly Stupid Obamacare Story You'll Read All Day

He has ten home-schooled children and he's opposed to government healthcare, yet his children are covered by Medicaid. This is exactly how these people justify their glaring contradictions. His kids are on Medicaid, but that's only because the government is taking too much of his money in taxes so he's taking some of it back.
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He has ten home-schooled children and he's opposed to government healthcare, yet his children are covered by Medicaid. This is exactly how these people justify their glaring contradictions. His kids are on Medicaid, but that's only because the government is taking too much of his money in taxes so he's taking some of it back.
get_a_brain_morans

I just -- I don't even -- just read this, via Charlie Pierce:

"I don't think that the government should be involved in health care or health insurance," says Greg Collett, a 41-year-old software developer in Caldwell, Idaho, who would rather pay the fine for now -- $95 the first year -- than signup. "I calculated it out and it is cheaper for me for the next four years to pay the fine rather than get coverage," Collett said. "At some point where it would make financial sense to pay for insurance rather than pay fines, I will make the decision from a financial standpoint."...Collett counts himself among the 29 percent of people who said in an NBCNews/Kaiser poll they are angry about the health reform law. "The issue for me is that it is not the proper role of government," he said.

Okay, so what happens if he's hit by a car or discovers a lump in one of his testicles? Hopefully, for his sake, it'll happen during the next open enrollment period or else he's going to incur a world of debt.

Now make sure you're not drinking any beverages when you read the next line...

Collett, who is married and has 10 children, says the kids are covered by Medicaid, the joint state-federal health insurance plan for people with low income and children who are not covered. But it's "absolutely not okay," that they are, Collett says quickly. "There are a lot of people out there that'll cry foul." Collett, whose children are home-schooled, likens taking Medicaid to sending children to public school. He also does not approve of government-funded public schools. "The government is taking your money. They are spending it on things they shouldn't be," he says. "Trying to get whatever you can back -- I have nothing against that. You have to at some point try and get your tax dollars back."

He has ten home-schooled children and he's opposed to government healthcare, yet his children are covered by Medicaid. This is exactly how these people justify their glaring contradictions. His kids are on Medicaid, but that's only because the government is taking too much of his money in taxes so he's taking some of it back.

And good news! He and his wife are educating a litter of children. Watch out -- next year he'll be running for Congress.

UPDATE: I was joking about running for Congress. I didn't know he actually ran for state office.

Bob Cesca is the managing editor for The Daily Banter, the editor of BobCesca.com, the host of the Bubble Genius Bob & Chez Show podcast and a Huffington Post contributor.