George Zimmerman Still Loves His Gun, His Wife Maybe Not So Much

It's wise to avoid jumping to conclusions, but it's also prudent to keep in mind that that while in the eyes of the law George Zimmerman may be a "good guy with a gun," at the moment, all it takes is a split-second for him to become a bad guy with a gun. I can't help but think that, given his history, he should already be considered one.
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It's wise to avoid jumping to conclusions, but it's also prudent to keep in mind that that while in the eyes of the law George Zimmerman may be a "good guy with a gun," at the moment, all it takes is a split-second for him to become a bad guy with a gun. I can't help but think that, given his history, he should already be considered one.
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You're going to be shocked, shocked I tell you, by this news, but George Zimmerman was detained by cops again today after his estranged wife said that he threatened her with a gun.

According to reports from Lake Mary police in Central Florida, Shellie Zimmerman called 911 from her parents' home, claiming that Zimmerman had just punched her aging father in the face and was now stalking around out front with his hand on his gun. Cops arrived and took Zimmerman and his beloved handgun -- the one he bought not long after being acquitted of murdering Trayvon Martin -- away for questioning. He's since been released and, one would imagine, will continue to be until he finally shoots somebody again, provided that person isn't black.

Zimmerman and his wife have been having "problems" since the end of the trial, with Mrs. Zimmerman saying that the court victory made her erstwhile teddy bear into an arrogant ass who thinks he's invincible. She finally just gave up and filed for divorce last week. According to Shellie Zimmerman, her father's wounds are obvious and not only will he back up her story but so will a Lake Mary city worker, who saw the whole thing from across the street. This is important because Shellie Zimmerman admittedly doesn't have the best recent track record when it comes to telling the truth: She copped to a misdemeanor perjury charge for lying when she testified about her and her husband's financial situation at Zimmerman's bond hearing in June of last year. Certainly not saying she's lying now, only that something like that is the kind of thing Zimmerman's supporters will immediately -- and ironically -- jump on to try to impugn her credibility.

It's never a good idea these days to immediately believe a media narrative. The truth of any case and certainly the reality of who a person is and what his or her behaviors, motivations, and overall reputation might be is often a complex thing. A lot of press outlets will get caught up in perpetuating a narrative and will do so without even thinking and certainly without malice. Why? Because the narrative is a better story. Once someone becomes a public figure and the center of a media maelstrom, those niche elements who align on various sides of the story often affirm and reaffirm the prevailing narrative about that person their audiences already believe. It's a form of preaching to the choir.

In this case, if you think George Zimmerman is a lunatic racist who's always one (more) unguarded moment away from killing somebody (else) with the gun he worships, you're going to see any report on him that makes the news as proof of your belief. If you think he's an innocent guy who's been unfairly vilified by the mob, you're going to see every one of those reports that make the news as proof of his unjust persecution. Somewhere in the middle is generally the truth. That said, Zimmerman's had three brushes with the law since his acquittal, two of which are very minor but one of which is now for an apparently violent incident involving a gun.

It's wise to avoid jumping to conclusions, but it's also prudent to keep in mind that that while in the eyes of the law George Zimmerman may be a "good guy with a gun," at the moment, all it takes is a split-second for him to become a bad guy with a gun. I can't help but think that, given his history, he should already be considered one.