Brad Paisley’s “Accidental Racist” Is Purposefully Stupid

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Let’s be honest: Country songs aren’t exactly written with repeated playings at Mensa meetings in mind. With a few very notable exceptions, country music “artists” tend to eschew analogy and subtext in favor of just coming out and saying whatever the hell it is they’re trying to get across. When the guy who won this year’s Academy of Country Music award for Entertainer of the Year sings “Rain Is a Good Thing,” he’s not talking about a metaphoric rain that will wash away his pain so that a bright new day can dawn; he’s talking about rain. Rain that makes corn, which makes whiskey, which makes his baby feel frisky. And that’s, you know, a good thing. There’s not much depth to country music, and when a Hail Mary pass at profundity is attempted, it usually winds up sounding like the kind of thing you’d imagine coming from a frat boy who’s had too much to drink and is suddenly unleashing some of the sad poetry he secretly writes on you at 3am.

Which brings us to the new song by Brad Paisley. It’s called Accidental Racist and it’s about — get ready for the surprising wordplay — accidentally being viewed as a racist. In the song, Paisley laments how hard it for him these days as a white man who loves the South and is proud of it and of his Southern heritage. See, Paisley wants to be able to wear his confederate flag t-shirt, but he wants to make sure people know that by doing it he’s just saying, “Hey, I’m a Lynyrd Skynyrd fan.” (For the record, I’d be less embarrassed to say that I flaunt the stars-and-bars because I think black people should be kept as property than to admit that I like Lynyrd Skynyrd, but whatever.) He also says that he feels caught between “Southern pride and Southern blame,” cranking the melodramatic self-pity to unimaginable levels and creating what I can’t deny might be the very first emo country song.

In keeping with country music tradition I’ll dispense with the irony and sarcasm that risks going over people’s heads and just flat out say it: Accidental Racist is an unimaginably awful song, the kind of thing that’s so batshit insane that as you’re hearing it, you can’t believe you’re actually hearing it. And that’s before LL Cool J inexplicably comes in to provide an ebony-and-ivory-style counterbalance of racial misunderstanding by bemoaning the fact that white people apparently think he’s a hood because he wears gold chains. The point, I guess, is that everybody’s to blame and everybody needs to just put their prejudices and stereotypes away in the name of creating a better America, or at least one where white people can be free from the persecution that’s apparently dogged them for centuries. Can’t we all just get along, y’all?

I’m all about bucking political correctness, but to put the comically ridiculous conceit of white oppression to a crappy, “Freedom Costs a Buck-Oh-Five”-style country melody and try to sell it as a sober meditation on racism and a plea for social harmony is cynical at best, offensive at worst. Yeah, I know it sucks that Paisley and his fans can’t plaster the backs of their pick-ups with “The South’s Gonna Rise Again” bumper stickers without at least a couple of people thinking they’re redneck assholes, but trust me, it beats being on the other side of the history they’re claiming to honor. You know, being the people who were bought and sold at auction and who were regularly beaten whenever they stepped out of line. I’d try to wrap my head around why LL Cool J would have anything at all to do with such a mind-boggling endeavor, but I guess it’s important to note that this is LL Cool J we’re talking about — he’s not exactly known for being discerning when it comes to picking projects.

Don’t get me wrong: I’m pretty sure that Brad Paisley’s heart was in the right place with this. I think he probably really does believe he’s extending a “cotton branch” from the tradition-steeped South to the 21st century in the name of building bridges of racial understanding. But comparing white Southern pride with a love for the New York Yankees — claiming that they’re alike in passion and are equally benign — makes you either woefully misguided or monumentally fucking stupid. And if I’m wrong and Paisley’s in fact doing nothing more than tawdrily pandering to an audience that’s constantly looking for cultural absolution for sins it doesn’t really believe it committed in the first place, then Accidental Racist is even more repugnant than it seems to be at first blush.

As it stands, the song is a lunkheaded defense of the better parts of Southern history that masquerades as a halfhearted apology for the worse.

  • handsomeblackcowboybraytravis

    Brad isn’t a racist-think is 2010 hit,”Welcome To the Future,”but he;s likely under pressure by the Bubba element to perform more “Confederate-loving” fare.Anyway,if Brad weren’t regarded pinup boy handsome by a lot of lady fans,he’d be like so many other struggling Country acts.
    (I’ve written between 150 and 200 original Country lyrics spanning the gamut from Traditional Country to rockabilly to cowboy songs to ballads,and if you’re agreeable,next week,I’ll post a few here for you folks’ appraisal.Heck,I’d write for Brad if he wished!!!!!!)

  • Brad Baylis

    FJ 200,I’ll Email you some copies of a few of my 150-200 original Country lyrics to prove that I’m a good writer as well!!!!!

  • Brad Baylis

    I meant,”Muscular,BEEFY build,”of course!!!!!!!!

  • Brad Baylis

    Bob,if Country can turn hot blonde chicks into stars,it should be able to turn this good ol’ black Canadian lad,61-July 6-with boyish good looks,a muscular,beffy build-I’m 5’9″,205 lb.,boasting 181/2″ pythons (“ARMS,”gals!!!!),though like A LOT of older chaps,I’m trying to drop about 20 lb.-who’s written 150-200 original Country lyrics into a song-writer.(I’m also said to resemble a handsome black cowboy stud IN AND OUT of my Wranglers and other casual and/or Western duds!!!!)

  • Brad Baylis

    If I beat up Brad Paisley-though I’m a BIG FAN!!!!!!-would that be bullying?(We’re both about 5’9″,but “Little Brad’s” about 145,while I’m about 60 lb., heavier,with 181/2″ guns
    “ARMS”,gals!!!!!!!.Then again,if Brad beat ME up,would HE be bullying ME?He’s 41;I’m 23 days shy of 61!!!!!)

  • handsomerandyblackladbrad1953

    FJ200,Toby Keith is MUCH MORE dumb-a** than dip-s**t.(Though most of his recent stuff BOWS CHUNKS!!!!!!)I bet if I met him,we two boys could talk about buxom cowgirls over brews.Also,if he’d let me,I’d write him some much more challenging fare than the swill of recent years.

  • handsomerandyblackladbrad1953

    Though I’m a Brad Paisley fan-and I’M BLACK!!!!!!!!!-dude’s a dumb good ol’ boy!!!!!!!(and NOT JUST for “Accidental Racist,” a lot of self-justification b.s.)
    At 61-July 6-and a good ol’ black Canadian lad with boyish good looks,a muscular if beefy build-I’m 5’9″,205-210 lb.,boasting 181/2″ guns [biceps,gals!!!!]-who’s said to resemble a handsome black cowboy stud IN AND OUT of my Wranglers and other casual and/or Western duds,I bet I could write FAR BETTER LYRICS that little Bad Brad or his writers because I’ve ALREADY penned 150-200 original Country lyrics spanning the gamut from Tradidional to rockabilly to cowboy songs to ballads.(No “bro Country,however;I can’t ride a pickup truck,and when the moon’s out,I’m either asleep or reading a good book.’Bye,folks!!)

  • Proud southerner

    While trying to show tolerance towards discrimination of African Americans. you’re doing it towards the south now. It’s hypocrisy! I absolutely love the south.. It’s not all beer drinking, rebel lovin, trashy trailer assholes. I agree the song is ignorant but were not all like that… Country singers give us a bad name…The south and north are obviously a little different and there’s a lot of “southern values” the families hold passed down from generations and I think that’s what the flag means…now..

  • Brett Baylis

    Bob Simonhouse,I’m a black Canadian lad with boyish good looks.Maybe Country music can turn ME into a star!!!(Of course,likely not;I’ll be 60 July 6!!!!)

  • Brett Baylis

    RIGHT ON,CHEZ PAZIENZA!!!!!I guess when you’re a fat,stupid,white lumpen proletariat,you have nothing else to hold onto save racial pipe dreams!!!!

  • Brett Baylis

    For your information,Paisley’s song,”Welcome To The Future’ mentions Mrs. Rosa Parks,Dr. King (“A woman on a bus/and a man with a dream”),and a black high school buddy,a football running back on whose lawn a cross was burned for asking out the [white] homecoming queen.Doesn’t sound like a redneck intent upon high-
    lighting or even excusing bigotry,even if,as a black Canadin lad,the Confederate Traitor rag is vile and loathsome to me.(My great-great grandfather was an escaped Maryland slave,and my step-grandmother a Tuscaloosa,Ala.,sharecropper in the ’20’s who went to Detroit and married my grandfather in 1938.)Sounds as if Paisley and LLCool J. hit on a controversial subject with “Accidental Racist,” but in today’s Southern U.S.A., LOT of black lads date and wed hot white Southern birds!!!

  • skilletblonde

    LL Cool J has always been a profoundly ignorant man. Obviously, both men have about a 4th grade mentality.

  • Susan Lynn

    Posted a quote on my FB that Colbert made on his show about this song (“Wearing a confederate flag means you like Lynyrd Skynyrd in the same way that burning crosses means you like Madonna”) and got smacked with a comment from a good friend about how it was not funny and they have the flags in their house and it’s all about being proud of being Southern and only a true Southerner would understand. The comment wouldn’t have bothered me if it hadn’t been from someone I consider a close friend. Things got ugly. I thought the Colbert comment was hilarious.

  • http://www.facebook.com/bob.simonhouse Bob Simonhouse

    You had me at “country music”, ie. talentless, pandering garbage. But CM did find a niche: turn hot blonde chicks into CM stars. At least it is something nice to look at, its just too bad they have to play “music” too.

  • sqeptiq

    Unfortunate that the song defends the Confederate flag, which is indefensible. It’s inextricably linked to slavery and support for segregation and Jim Crow. It was incorporated into the Georgia state flag in 1956 to protest Brown vs Board of education (it was removed from that flag in 2001) and was flown above the South Carolina capital in 1962 to show support for white supremacy and opposition to the civil rights movement.

  • FJ200

    Chez, I have to say that from a country music standpoint, this song is trite pandering crap. However, I have to tell you that Brad Paisley took a lot of heat in 2009 for his song “Welcome to the Future” which some of his more idiotic fans thought was a tribute to the newly elected Barack Obama. That song was musically crappy too but it kind of shows that Paisley is not a Toby Keith style redneck dipshit. Paisley is widely known to be one of the good guys in country music and is also one of the few big country stars who actually has some talent. I’m not sure why he felt the need to make this song. His song choices of late have been pretty bad. Check out “Southern Comfort Zone” in which he talks about traveling the world and encourages the listener to do the same and see it from other folks’ perspectives. It’s an interesting sentiment for a country song, but I hate the song from a musical standpoint.
    As a Tennessean, I am conflicted sometimes about my love for the South and my embarrassment and frustration at some of the self-defeating stupidity of southerners. However, I get my hackles up when the South is disparaged even when I know what the critic is saying is somewhat true. It’s just a part of being from here.
    Anyway, the point is that while song is musically crappy and sentimentally ham-fisted, it does not mean that Brad Paisley is a racist asshole or is apologizing for racist assholes. It just means he has put out a stupid song.
    For a really gifted country singer-songwriter, try Chris Knight or Scott Miller.

  • http://www.politicalruminations.com/ nicole

    Hey Paisley……….fuck you and your idea of Southern pride!

    Adds……..and it’s a bone stupid song anyway.

  • disqus_xZ8hAWnX53

    “cranking the melodramatic self-pity to unimaginable levels and creating what I can’t deny might be the very first emo country song” … that is pretty awesome.

  • trgahan

    Another example of the constant lamentation from American white guys about how they can’t be inconsiderate dicks anymore and, not only be free from judgment, but be applauded as exhibiting virtuous behavior.
    Whining and using the excuse of “Southern Pride” when society at large asks you to at least consider other people’s experiences/ideas/etc is juvenile at best.

    • Susan Lynn

      BRAVO

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1655290390 Steven Skelton

    “….pandering to an audience that’s constantly looking for cultural absolution for sins it doesn’t really believe it committed in the first place.”

    They didn’t commit those sins. Sure, there are a few white guys who held power in the 50’s and 60’s drooling in nursing homes somewhere….but Bull Connor is as dead as his dogs. Generations X, Y, the millennials and even the baby boomers didn’t enslave anyone, nor were they the generations that fought integration.

    I guess this is about the sins of the fathers…..

    • Christopher Foxx

      Yes, everything has been hunky dory for generations. The last vestige of racial strife vanished from the South nearly 50 years ago. Nobody alive today ever did anything oppressive.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1655290390 Steven Skelton

        I never said they didn’t Christopher, and I never said the racism in the south is completely wiped out.

        Putting words in my mouth isn’t fair.

        • Christopher Foxx

          Obviously I’m overstating for emphasis. But the gist of your posting does seem to be that current folks don’t have any racial discrimination sins to apologize for. And the bigotry in the South (or elsewhere) hasn’t vanished.

          • http://twitter.com/spookiewon Pjay (Patti) Pender

            MANY “current folks” actually don’t have any “racial discrimination sins to apologize for.” That some do doesn’t mean everyone owes you an apology.

          • Christopher Foxx

            Again, you’re complaining about something I never said. Show me where I said everyone owes an apology.

            What did happen was Steven Skelton suggested nobody around today has been oppressive, that it was all in the past.

            “Generations X, Y, the millennials and even the baby boomers didn’t enslave anyone, nor were they the generations that fought integration.

            I guess this is about the sins of the fathers…..”

            And I challenged him on that. There are folks around today, in generations X, Y, Millennials, pick any one you like, that discriminate.

    • Lady Willpower

      If most Southerners had nothing to do with the sins of the Civil Rights movement (and I don’t disagree with that) then why do they care if they can wear this stupid flag? They know what it means. Oh, sure, they try to come up with benign excuses for wanting to show the flag, but it’s all misdirection. It’s the CONFEDERATE flag. The Confederacy supported Slavery.

      If I was German and I had nothing to do with WWII, does it make sense that I’d want to wear the swastika? Would I feel oppressed because the swastika upsets people? I hate to bring Hitler into it, but it’s fair for this comparison.

      The Confederate flag is still a symbol of oppression to many people. I see that shit ALL the time here in Georgia. It creeps me out. Because while I don’t think it automatically makes one a racist, someone who flies that flag knows what kind of feelings it stirs up. They do it anyway. If I was that excited about a t-shirt I owned, but I knew it made people uncomfortable, knew it reminded people of Slavery, knew i was just doing it to be contrary- I’d say “fuck it, I got other shirts.”

      Or to put it another way, if those were the sins of my fathers I wouldn’t want to keep reminding people.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1655290390 Steven Skelton

        While that’s all very interesting, I didn’t say anything about anyone’s shirt. I only responded to the sentence about the sins these people supposedly committed.

        I will respond to your second to last paragraph though. To many, the confederate flag is a symbol of oppression, and I respect that. To many others, it’s a symbol of pride in their heritage that doesn’t have anything to do with racism or slavery…and the point of that admittedly cheesy song is that we would didn’t assign our meaning to the actions and appearances of others.

        Peace.

      • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1655290390 Steven Skelton

        While that’s all very interesting, I didn’t say anything about anyone’s shirt. I only responded to the sentence about the sins these people supposedly committed.

        I will respond to your second to last paragraph though. To many, the confederate flag is a symbol of oppression, and I respect that. To many others, it’s a symbol of pride in their heritage that doesn’t have anything to do with racism or slavery…and the point of that admittedly cheesy song is that we would didn’t assign our meaning to the actions and appearances of others.

        Peace.

        • http://www.politicalruminations.com/ nicole

          “To many others, it’s a symbol of pride in their heritage”

          Really? Kinda like the Nazis have pride in their heritage, eh? Do you think it would be any less offensive to wear/display a Confederate flag as a “symbol of pride”?

          “peace”

          Not cool when you’re defending a symbol of the society that enslaved, abused and murdered a whole people. Not at all.

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1655290390 Steven Skelton

            Nicole

            I would credit it as a personal favor if you just interacted more with the others here and less with me.

            Oh, and google Godwin’s law while your at it.

          • http://www.politicalruminations.com/ nicole

            I imagine you would like it if I never responded to your asinine comments. Too bad, Skelton.

            Godwin’s law does not apply to the analogy I made. And if it did, I would still be right. But, hey, at least you are vaguely familiar with Godwin’s law.

          • Elmo

            Arguing the comparison of the confederate flag/slavery to the the Nazi’s is an example of Godwin’s law is ludicrous. Its a completely apt and appropriate analogy. Do you realize steven that historian’s general estimate is that of the 12-15 million Africans were transported to the America’s between the 15th and 19th century, 10-20 percent died on the trip alone? This statistic completely leaves out the God knows how many who died with the “procurement” of the slaves in Africa and those who died and whose descendants died thereafter at the hands of the slavemasters. Yes steven comparison to the nazis is completely appropriate when we are talking about genocide and the mass murder of millions as occurred in the American slavery era. I am sorry your knowledge of history is so inadequate to understand the issue. As one whose direct descendants died preserving our union I suggest you address your ignorance.

          • Elmo

            PS: German law outlaws use of the swatisika in relation to Nazi ideology.

        • http://twitter.com/chezpazienza Chez Pazienza

          I’m not sure what’s worse, Steven, that you’re never on the right side of any debate — ever — or that you’re insistent that your libertarian “lack of a side” somehow makes you above it all. I’m sure you’re a good enough guy, but your constant attempts at moral relativism truly are insufferable.

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1655290390 Steven Skelton

            You shouldn’t use absolutes Chez. Just three days ago I agreed with you and commented that I thought your essay (Mark Sanford) was well written.

          • http://twitter.com/chezpazienza Chez Pazienza

            Then given your track record, maybe I need to go back and have another look at my own opinion. I worry if you agree with me. I’d say you’re a professional troll, but I actually do believe you subscribe to the views you subscribe to — and again, I’m not sure which is worse. You truly do consider yourself an independent thinker but I can’t stress enough how easy it is to always take the trite “libertarian” viewpoint.

        • Lady Willpower

          Mr. Skelton- The problem with your explanation is that some symbols have an intrinsic meaning to them now, regardless of what the wearer wishes. So while some who display a Confederate flag aren’t racists and don’t really mean anything by it, the symbol is inextricably linked with Slavery and oppression. It’s done. The symbol cannot be reclaimed.

          The swastika is the same. Originally a symbol of peace in many cultures, the swastika has now become utterly corrupted. Probably for all time.

          It comes down to consideration for others. Are you (not you personally) so attached to your silly flag iconography that you’re willing to give the impression of racism? Is it really worth it?

          It’s funny, because people who insist on being able to display their Confederate flags always try the “what’s the big deal?” argument. Hey pal, if it’s such a big deal why don’t you just not do it. Put up a different flag. Put up a picture of Dale Earnhart. Something else.

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1655290390 Steven Skelton

            Lady Willpower

            I can’t agree that Swastika equals stars and bars.

            I do thank you for the thoughtful exchange though.

            Peace

          • Lady Willpower

            This seems to be one of your favorite debating tactics, Steven:
            “These two things aren’t exactly equal, so let’s not even bother comparing them at all.”

            Just to be clear, the Third Reich was worse than the Confederacy. Both were terrible. Neither should be celebrated. Neither one should have their indicia on a bumper sticker.

        • Christopher Foxx

          To many others, it’s a symbol of pride in their heritage

          Which part of that heritage, exactly? How do you celebrate something about southern history without recognizing that slavery was an intrinsic, indivisible part of it?

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1655290390 Steven Skelton

            I’d have to write an essay to respond to that properly, so I’ll just give you an analogy.

            I’m proud of who I am, but I’m not proud of everything I’ve done. I’ve done some horrible things that make me turn the radio station when they pop into my head (like that would make a difference,) but it would not be fair to say those things are the be all and end all of who I am. They are an intrinsic and indivisible part of me, that they are not the sole definition of who I am.

          • Christopher Foxx

            “I could answer you, but there’s so much I can’t take the time to list even one thing.” What a cop out answer.

            So you “change the station” when recalling things you aren’t proud of. I assume it would be safe to say, then that you don’t wave around a banner symbolic of those horrible things you’ve done.

          • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1655290390 Steven Skelton

            Steven has a job and has to work very hard.

          • Christopher Foxx

            Steven isn’t the only one. I’m happy to wait until the next time you have sufficient free time.

          • Christopher Foxx

            (…but won’t hold my breath while doing so.)

        • http://www.facebook.com/bob.simonhouse Bob Simonhouse

          Except, the heritage they’re proud of does, in large part, include slavery. I think their inability to disassociate their heritage with slavery is what makes “confederate pride” people upset about others getting upset when they display their pride with the confederate flag. They can’t deny their heritage does have a lot to do with racism and slavery, despite they may wish to pick and choose which aspects they are proud of. It doesn’t work that way, especially with symbols. Besides, its quite fair to say racism is alive and well in the south today, so its even more delusional to think they can separate the symbol from the heritage when the heritage hasn’t changed that much.

      • Christopher Foxx

        If I was that excited about a t-shirt I owned, but I knew it made people uncomfortable, knew it reminded people of Slavery, knew I was just doing it to be contrary- I’d say “fuck it, I got other shirts.”

        What if the shirt was a marriage equality shirt and the people were made uncomfortable because they don’t like gays?

        • Lady Willpower

          I guess that’s a very good question. I’d like to say I’ll be really considerate of that viewpoint, but I’d be lying. For me, and I think most people, the Confederacy represents oppression. The flag is a none-too-subtle reminder of Slavery. A reminder of a time when my people were treated as less than human. Anyone who feels like they just HAVE to wear that flag, regardless of the very real human message behind it, is making a statement that I can’t support. It’s completely logical that people would be upset and offended by that.

          The support for gay marriage is about love, equality, freedom and understanding. Anyone who gets upset by those things is not someone I’d care about offending.

          Guess that makes me a giant hypocrite.

          • dbtheonly

            It makes you human.

            We all have inconsistencies.

            The Confederate Flag & even the Swastika have their place. They are both part of history & we “disappear” them to our loss of the knowledge of their meaning.

            To the point though: you can wear anything you want but I think you should re-think things if your intent is to offend. But your right, someone can be offended by anything.

          • Christopher Foxx

            Guess that makes me a giant hypocrite.

            Not at all. There’s a consistency in your view. Which I fully support and share.

            (And thanks for answering my question. I was afraid when I posted it that it would be viewed (incorrectly) as my being troll-ish and supporting wearing the confederate flag. Appreciate your taking it in the spirit intended.)

        • trgahan

          From my experience, the difference is the person wearing the marriage equality logo knows and accepts they will offend some people and frequently have people tell them so to their face. They understand
          their stance and accept the consequences.

          The song talks about people who can’t handle ANYONE disapproving of them wearing confederate flag logo’s or similar symbols. They feel the antebellum South was “REAL AMERICA!” and everything since is a perversion from what was intended. A single person disagreeing with them is intolerable.

        • http://twitter.com/spookiewon Pjay (Patti) Pender

          Because I fully understand that “freedom of speech” and “never being offended” cannot both be had, and “freedom of speech” is SO MUCH more valuable, I say we all wear whatever the he11 shirts we choose.

    • http://www.politicalruminations.com/ nicole

      The Confederate Flag is the symbol of a way of life. A way of life that included white people buying and selling black people as property.

      In my opinion, flaunting such a symbol is flaunting not only approval of that way of life, but a yearning for said way of life. Not to mention the fact that it’s highly disrespectful to those who were bought and sold.

      Get a freaking grip, Skelton. Paisley is a racist, and if you also have a desire to wear that flag or you think it;s perfectly fine for the good ole boys to wear it, or you think it’s cool for anyone to wear it, so the hell are you.

      • Christopher Foxx

        Answer is simple. If you’re a southerner and want to wear a symbol to show pride in where you’re from, pick something other than the confederate flag.

      • http://twitter.com/spookiewon Pjay (Patti) Pender

        You are mistaken. Paisley is not a racist. If you believe that a tee shirt can make you a bigot, you are a bigot yourself.

        • Christopher Foxx

          Pjay (Patti) Pender : If you believe that a tee shirt can make you a bigot, you are a bigot yourself.

          As is typical of folks defending the indefensible, you’ve claimed we’ve said something we never did. Of course a tee shirt can’t turn you into a bigot. (“Omigod. There’s a magic spell on this shirt. Suddenly I hate people from Iowa!”) Ridiculous.

          However, it is true that wearing a symbol that represents a history of slavery and insisting that it doesn’t is racist behavior.

          If you want to claim it taking pride in the confederate flag isn’t tinged with racism, then tell me which part of that southern heritage is wearing it meant to celebrate? How do you celebrate something about southern history without recognizing that slavery was an intrinsic, indivisible part of it?

          • Susan Lynn

            I wish I could copy/paste so many of the things I’ve read here (regarding the flag being indefensible), because they’re brilliant. :) I mean that, honestly.

      • http://twitter.com/Freedom4all123 Freedom4all

        Paisley isn’t a racist. What he and many other white southern men of a certain age are is dumb. The flag they love so much represents not a “way of life” but one where the South kept it’s rebel statement as a protest of being forced to free the slaves which killed their economy. See, the way of life some southern white men miss is basically Jim Crow laws, seperate everything for whites and blacks, keeping blacks down by finding ways to keep them poor and out of sight, and hanging those who ever looked funny at their daughters. What the flag represents is a protest mentality. One where the South got their asses handed to them in a war THEY CHOSE to fight while claiming to be the real America. Sorry southerners, wave your flag but I still see an ignorant person who is beyond any intellectual honesty. The same culture southern white males claim to love is one of blissful ignorance. That’s fine but it’s ironic they get mad at those who wave a REBEL, LOSER flag and question black people’s culture or people who choose to live a certain way in other parts of the country. The day I hear a Southerner tell me that it’s okay to be who you are and stop electing people who force their “values” on others, then that will be the day I stop commenting on their love of a flag that represents massive failure on an epic level.

  • Art__VanDalay

    I have read several posts on this travesty, but have thus far been smart enough not to click play.

  • zirgar

    Funny thing is Paisley and LL Cool J created a song that people actually hate more than they hate each other. People put aside all their petty differences to unite just long enough to hate this song. Brings a tear to my eye…

    • Lady Willpower

      In a sense the song really is a modern version of “Ebony and Ivory” then.

  • ranger11

    Can’t say I understand much of this Southern pride thing in the first place. Is there a Northern equivalent? Being born and raised in Jersey I don’t really remember it. What’s so special about the pre-Civil War South anyway? That place was pretty retrograde. I don’t get it. I would also say that I think someone like Johnny Cash had a bit more depth than than the present crew. Although maybe he was a bit more rock than country in the end.

    • http://twitter.com/chezpazienza Chez Pazienza

      It’s the same kind of epic irony on display whenever unemployed, uneducated shit-kickers shout about “white pride” and how the white race is supposedly superior. It’s never Bill Gates or Stephen Hawking or George Clooney who boast about how white people are better than everyone else — it’s always the asshole who lives in a trailer, drinks warm Keystone Light out of a can, and has household appliances rusting in what passes for his front yard.

    • http://www.facebook.com/bob.simonhouse Bob Simonhouse

      The American south is the American middle east.